Let Me Breathe

Hamish
November 7, 2019

If you had been cooped up in a bottle for a year or more, you’d probably want to stretch your legs wouldn’t you. Imagine getting out of that bottle, and stretching, and then filling your lungs with air. Well that’s not exactly what happens with wine, but it gives you an idea. You see what happens in the bottle is that the wine matures – this is the process of some of the compounds in the wine changing chemical structure.

But, because there is almost no oxygen in the bottle, the wine can’t fully develop. That’s where breating or aeration comes in.

If you’ve ever seen a sliced apple go brown, you know what oxidation – the brown colour is caused by oxidation.

While you might not want it in apples, it is a necessary part of the process in a good wine.

Letting the wine breathe will improve both the flavour (what you taste) and the aroma (what you smell).

Not all wine needs to breathe. Most white wines don’t, and cheap or very fruity reds don’t need to either.

Fortunately, in our tasting notes we tell you whether you should let your wine breathe and for how long.

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Where It All Began…

I saw that many of my friends had the same issue. They used similar tactics to avoid the choice overload – always choose the same grape or region, look for the awards, find a nice label, or, search somewhere in my memory – “what did I have last time?”.

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Are you an ABC?

Some of you looked at the region, and some of you have a go-to winery. Yet others knew the wines they DIDN’T like – we heard a few ABCs – “Anything but Chardonnay!” (It wasn’t just Chardonnay; many of you have grape varieties that you don’t particularly like).

CONTINUE READING

Let Me Breathe

If you had been cooped up in a bottle for a year or more, you’d probably want to stretch your legs wouldn’t you. Imagine getting out of that bottle, and stretching, and then filling your lungs with air.

CONTINUE READING